Hurricane Inspections and Wind Mitigation Reports

Hurricane Inspections and Wind Mitigation Reports

After hurricane Andrew in Florida, insurance companies in Florida have been trying to encourage home owners to make their homes safer and reduce insurance claims. Many of the insurance companies and JUA (Joint Underwriting Association) now request a Four Point Inspection.

A “Four Point Inspection” focuses only on four main areas of interest in a home:Four Point Inspection Services in Florida

  • HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning)
  • Electrical wiring and panels
  • Plumbing connections and fixtures
  • Roof

Most homes older than 25 years are required by their insurance companies to get this inspection done. Insurance companies require four point inspections to evaluate the age and condition of the components of your home. Though homeowners insurance policies don’t typically cover these areas, if they are old or in disrepair, they could contribute to a covered event such as damage from a fire or severe weather. Some insurance companies have their own forms they want complete but most of them accept forms filled out by our licensed professionals. The report needed includes specific information about the HVAC, plumbing, electrical system and roof in a short one or two page signed document.

Understand Your Wind Mitigation Report

First and foremost there is NO PASS or FAIL for the Wind Mitigation Report.  It is just an evaluation as to the construction of the home to see if you qualify for insurance discounts.  Just because you do not get every discount does not mean your house was built poorly or substandard.  Your house passed the guidelines set by the state of Florida and the present jurisdiction your in.  This form was compromised in 2012, so it did not exist when many of the houses were built, so the builder did not have this form when the houses were built so how could he maximize the discounts?

Once again there is NO PASS or FAIL.  It’s just an evaluation of what is present.  It is NOT an INSPECTION report of this company.  It is a report that was established by the Insurance Industry in Florida and we have very specific guidelines to follow and we are subject to have an inspector to follow up right behind us to ensure what we have reported is in fact the exact conditions that we reported.

Lets break it down line by line

OWNER INFORMATION – The heading is just the information that WE HAVE for the client.  It may not be filled out fully, its because we do NOT HAVE the information.  We have put in as much information as we have.  Feel free to add information to this header.

Here is an explanation of the Wind Mitigation Form

1. Building Code: This section asks if the building was built In compliance with the 2001 Florida Building Code or if the home is located in a High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) that that is built in compliance with the South Florida Building Code of 1994 (SFBC-94). This is determined by the permit application date of the building. The plans were drawn up and approved under the building codes that were in effect at that time. This lets the insurance company know how old and what codes it was built under. There is nothing that can change this other than demolition of the house and rebuild under newer codes.

2. Roof Covering: This section is asking for the application date of when the roof covering was installed or the (2001 Florida Building Code) FBC/MDC (Miami-Dade County) product approval numbers for the roof covering installed. If a roof was replaced and no permit was pulled there is no verification of what codes this was replaced under, therefore the date will be either the last recorded permit pulled for the roof or the original installation during the time of original construction. To qualify for option A. 2001 Building Code the permit application date has to be on or after 03/01/2002. To qualify for option B. Miami Dade approval listing current at the time of the installation or for HVHZ only, permit applications date after 09/01/1994 and before 03/02/2002.

3. Roof Deck Attachment: The weakest form has to be documented. The form pretty much describes it. This is document what type attachment is used to hold on the roof sheathing and how much uplift it will withstand.

Option A: Plywood/Oriented strand board (OSB) roof sheathing attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24″ inches o.c.)by staples or 6d nails spaced at 6″ along the edge and 12″ in the field. -OR- Batten decking supporting wood shakes or wood shingles. -OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift less than that required for Options B or C below.

Option B: Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16″inch attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24″inches o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 12″ inches in the field.-OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that is shown to have an equivalent or greater resistance 8d nails spaced a maximum of 12 inches in the field or has a mean uplift resistance of at least 103 psf.

Option C: Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16″inch attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24″inches o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 6″ inches in the field. -OR- Dimensional lumber/Tongue & Groove decking with a minimum of 2 nails per board (or 1 nail per board if each board is equal to or less than 6 inches in width). –OR Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that is shown to have an equivalent or greater resistance than 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 6 inches in the field or has a mean uplift resistance of at least 182 psf

Option D: Reinforce Concrete Roof Deck

Option E: Other

Option F: Unknown or Unidentified

Option G: No Attic Access

4. Roof to Wall Attachment: This section described the way the trusses are attached to the main house structure. A minimum of three nails need to be used with every option other than toe nails.

Toe Nails are a single nail driven through the truss at an angle into the top plate of the supporting wall.

Clips are metal connectors that do not wrap over the top of the truss/rafter, or Metal connectors with a minimum of 1 strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and does not meet the nail position requirements of C or D, but is secured with a minimum of 3 nails.

Single Wraps are metal connectors consisting of a single strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and is secured with a minimum of 2 nails on the front side and a minimum of 1 nail on the opposing side.

 

 

BOTTOM LINE GET A WIND MITIGATION THAT WILL SAVE YOU MONEY ON YOUR INSURANCE

AJ DEEREY

NAPLES HOME INSPECTOR

SLAB-2-SHINGLES